Social Media Marketing for Non-Profits links

Social Media for Non-Profits links

DIY light kit, Dlvr.it public beta, Should I put my URL in my ads?

These are my links for March 21st through March 24th:

WordPress 3, better Facebook search, a guide web typography, microformats ala Google

These are my links for March 12th through March 16th:

Digital ad spending overtakes print, Facebook ad spam, how to add YouTube video to your Facebook Fan page

These are my links for March 4th through March 8th:

Help finding influencers, pro audio for DSLR, SEM tools, and measuring social ROI

These are my links for February 22nd through February 24th:

Copy and Paste for iPhone tomorrow, advertising the day after that.

According to CrunchGear, a new service called Pastebud (@pastebud)will be released tomorrow enabling copy and paste for iPhone. From what I can tell, it cleverly uses 2 Javascript bookmarks and a web service to store the clipping whilst you switch apps. Cool, and a great temporary fix while Apple figures out how to make this possible internally on the iPhone.

Wait, Pastebud is going to store, at least temporarily, all the little clippings we’re all copying. That means they are going to have access to stats about not only what pages we’re looking at, but the exact phrases we’re interested in. How ’bout that for a targeted marketing opportunity?

That kind of statistical detail is worth a lot to advertisers. I wonder if Pastebud will be account driven? Hmm. In any case, I’ll bet we see a some sort of “most copied” web site or report ala Google’s Zeitgeist which will be interesting, if not profitable for Pastebud.

A list of 5 ways that Comcast sucks, today

Comcast can suck 5 times a day

Comcast can suck 5 times a day

  1. Comcast has called every day for the past week and left a message for me to call them back.  Calling the number they left places me at the general Comcast phone system menu.  What number do I press for, “I dunno douchebags, you called me?”.
  2. I have an account tied to one email address for comcast.com, and and a different email address and account for comcast.net.  Apparently, the two sides dont share info.
  3. In the menu tree, to reach the next menu, I have to wait though an advertisement… for a pay per view program I can’t even watch with my package.
  4. I made it through the Comcast phone number, entering my phone number, then my 16 digit account number (which I had to look up online, because I dont have it memorized), and got through to Anton. After a greeting from Anton, I asked why they called me.  Anton hung up.
  5. Finally, I was able to talk to a sales rep who was unable to suss out why they called me, but was plenty eager to offer, “Hey, while I have you, I see you’re not using Comcast for phone service…”

Battle of the clickTAGs for Flash ad click throughs.

First, a bit of background.  Flash banner ads are usually click-able.  Because the publishing site (ie network TV sites, online newspapers, etc) usually uses a third party ad system to serve and track banner ads, the destination URL for any click through is not hard coded into the SWF (Flash ad).  It is dynamically injected into the ad at runtime with the use of a “clickTAG” parameter in the object HTML.  The ad system handles the pairing of the ad and its accompanying clickTAG URL.

I make a fair amount of Flash banner ads for Grady Britton clients.  I’ve noticed a an annoyance that should be easily solved.  At some point since the invention of the clickTAG, there was a division on the correct case of “tag” in “clickTAG”.  Some publishers require that the variable name be “clickTag”, and others insist that it be named “clickTAG”.

Why does this matter?  It turns out that some of the third party ad systems are case sensitive when it comes to the use of clickTAG.  For me, that translates into creating 2 versions of every ad, one who’s code respects “clickTag”, and the other for “clickTAG”.

image of Adobe recommended clickTAG ActionScriptSure, I could write a simple switch to test which version exists and set accordingly, but the publishers employ QA folks armed with Flash decompilers. If the ActionScript that the decompiler reveals (which by the way, is rarely the actual ActionScript as written by the designer) does not exactly match the structure as required by QA, they won’t run the ad, regardless of whether or not it will work.

So, if the ad serving companies aren’t going to stick to “clickTAG” as recommended by Adobe, then let us designer/developers switch and validate the parameter without QA throwing up red flags because the ActionScript doesn’t look the same as the reference manual.  Creating one off versions of the ads to deal a basic case sensitivity issue is just silly, especially if it can be solved for all future projects with a few lines of ActionScript.

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